RoguePanda

Aug 20 2014

historicalfirearms:

1914: Armies of the Western Front

I’ve recently covered each of the armies of the Western Front as they were in August 1914, follow the links below for overviews of each of the armies, their mobilisation and their initial strategies. 

British Expeditionary Force

Deutsches Heer (Imperial German Army)

French Army

Belgian Army

You can also read about the mobilisation of all of the major powers here.

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demons:

A British POW suffering from shell-shock (PTSD), photographed with the 1000-yard stare

demons:

A British POW suffering from shell-shock (PTSD), photographed with the 1000-yard stare

(Source: iwm.org.uk)

Aug 13 2014

theracismrepellent:

quentintortellini:

History Parallels

1st image: 1967 Newark Riots

2nd image: 2014 Ferguson Protests

3rd image: 1964 Harlem Riots

4th image: 2014 Ferguson Protests

I want to sob…it’s racism but now in color

~Tae

(via badethnography)

Aug 12 2014

digsnarejordan:

Before there was VH1 Storytellers, there was Duke…behind the piano…in an empty room…talking about songs. If you’ve got an hour to waste, waste it here.

When I was younger, my uncle gave me a Duke compilation record out of a jazz magazine. I still have it and it’s one of the little joys in my life. His rendition of “Lotus Blossom” always chokes me up.

Enjoy the sounds and wisdom of a real American hero!

(via jazzrelatedstuff)

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darksilenceinsuburbia:


O Captain! My Captain!

BY WALT WHITMAN


O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done,
The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won,
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring;
                         But O heart! heart! heart!
                            O the bleeding drops of red,
                               Where on the deck my Captain lies,
                                  Fallen cold and dead.
O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills,
For you bouquets and ribbon’d wreaths—for you the shores a-crowding,
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;
                         Here Captain! dear father!
                            The arm beneath your head!
                               It is some dream that on the deck,
                                 You’ve fallen cold and dead.
My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still,
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will,
The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done,
From fearful trip the victor ship comes in with object won;
                         Exult O shores, and ring O bells!
                            But I with mournful tread,
                               Walk the deck my Captain lies,
                                  Fallen cold and dead.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

O Captain! My Captain!

BY WALT WHITMAN

O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done,
The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won,
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring;
                         But O heart! heart! heart!
                            O the bleeding drops of red,
                               Where on the deck my Captain lies,
                                  Fallen cold and dead.

O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up—for you the flag is flung—for you the bugle trills,
For you bouquets and ribbon’d wreaths—for you the shores a-crowding,
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;
                         Here Captain! dear father!
                            The arm beneath your head!
                               It is some dream that on the deck,
                                 You’ve fallen cold and dead.

My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still,
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will,
The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done,
From fearful trip the victor ship comes in with object won;
                         Exult O shores, and ring O bells!
                            But I with mournful tread,
                               Walk the deck my Captain lies,
                                  Fallen cold and dead.
Aug 07 2014
archaicwonder:

Extremely Rare “Year 2”  Nerva Tetradrachm struck in Antioch (Syria), 97-98 ADThis coin shows the laureate head of Nerva surrounded by AYT NEPOYAΣ KAIΣ ΣEB ΓERM, the aegis can be seen at the front and in back of the neck. The reverse says ETOYΣ NEOY IEPOY B with an eagle with its wings spread. It’s standing on a thunderbolt with a palm branch in left field. The inclusion of the title Germanicus on Nerva’s year 2 tetradrachms from Antioch date them to a short period between November 97, when he received the title, and his death in January 98. There are only 8 known specimens.
The portrait is of excellent style, but what the viewer is immediately attracted to is the huge size of the nose in proportion to the face and the large bulge of the forehead. We cannot know whether the engraver intended this effect or not, but it is striking nonetheless. A great example of exaggerated features on Roman coins.

archaicwonder:

Extremely Rare “Year 2”  Nerva Tetradrachm struck in Antioch (Syria), 97-98 AD

This coin shows the laureate head of Nerva surrounded by AYT NEPOYAΣ KAIΣ ΣEB ΓERM, the aegis can be seen at the front and in back of the neck. The reverse says ETOYΣ NEOY IEPOY B with an eagle with its wings spread. It’s standing on a thunderbolt with a palm branch in left field.

The inclusion of the title Germanicus on Nerva’s year 2 tetradrachms from Antioch date them to a short period between November 97, when he received the title, and his death in January 98. There are only 8 known specimens.

The portrait is of excellent style, but what the viewer is immediately attracted to is the huge size of the nose in proportion to the face and the large bulge of the forehead. We cannot know whether the engraver intended this effect or not, but it is striking nonetheless. A great example of exaggerated features on Roman coins.

(via 336bc)

Aug 05 2014
Aug 02 2014

oupacademic:

The First World War: A Global War

While it is called a ‘World War’, we sometimes forget the truly global nature of the conflict. The war spanned the continents, not only the fields of Flanders. Here are a few resources to understand the international conflict: 

Find further resources from us here on Tumblr, at the First World War Centenary Hub on our UK website, World War I: Commemorating the Centennial on our US website, the University of Oxford First World War activities, the World War I Centenary: Continuations and Beginnings resource center from the University of Oxford and JISC, Bodleian Libraries’ Oxford World War I Centenary Programme, and more to come throughout 2014. 

What books would you add to a list of resources for studying the global nature of the First World War?

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

Jul 29 2014
Jul 28 2014

peashooter85:

Marathon runners eat your hearts out —- The Tendai Monks of Mt. Hiei.

The Tendai Monks of Mt. Hiei in Japan are an ancient Buddhist order that trace their origins as far back 806 AD.  Masters of mental and physical discipline, among their regular meditation and religious worship, the Tendai Monks practice an ancient endurance challenge that ranks as one of the most grueling endurance challenges of all human history.

The Tendai Monks like to prove their mental discipline through acts of physical endurance.  These devoted Buddhists take the saying, “where the mind goes, the body will follow” to the highest extreme.  Called the “Kaihogyo” (circling the mountain), the Tendai Monks walk a series of roads and trails which circle Mt. Hiei.  The full Kaihogyo takes seven years to complete altogether, with the first year being a trial period, and the remaining six being the ultimate challenge.

Most monks typically only do the first year of the Kaihogyo, which is a challenge in itself.  In that year the monks walk 30 kilometers (18.6 miles) a day for 100 consecutive days.  During the walk, the monks only take breaks to pray or meditate at the various shrines that circle Mt. Hiei.  When walking the monks wear their traditional monastic garb, as well as hand woven straw sandals for footwear.   

If a monk completes the first year of the Kaihogyo, he may petition the remaining monks to complete the remaining six years of the challenge.  Originally in ancient and medieval Japan, there was no turning back after being accepted to complete the Kaihogyo.  Those who failed to complete the challenge committed ritual suicide.  Today in modern Japan, the suicide clause of the Kaihogyo has been removed from the challenge.

The remaining of the Kaihogyo follows as thus, on years 2 and 3 the monk must walk 30 km a day for 100 consecutive days.  On years 4 and 5 the monk must walk 30 km a day for 200 consecutive days.  On year 6 the monk must walk 60 km (37.3 miles) a day for 100 consecutive days.  Finally on year 7 the monk must walk a whopping 84 km a day (52.2 miles) for a consecutive 100 days, followed by a “cooling off” period of 30 km a day for 100 consecutive days.  During “rest periods” of the year, the monk is expected to complete all his monastic duties, such as administering to the public, meditating, worshiping, conducting scholarly studies, and completing chores around the monastery.

Those who complete Kaihogyo will have certainly achieved an amazing feet, walking 38,500 kilometers (23,860.7 miles).  That’s only about 1,500 km short of walking the circumference of the Earth.  Few have ever completed the challenge.  In fact since 1885 only 46 monks have successfully completed the full 1,000 days.  One of the oldest was a monk named Yusai Sakai, who completed the Kaihogyo at the age of 60 in 1987.  

(Source: barefoot-running.us)

Jul 27 2014
Jul 26 2014

atlasobscura:

Moray -Peru

Unlike a number of the elaborate metropolis’ and statuary left behind by the Incan people the rings at Moray are relatively simple but may have actually been an ingenious series of test beds. Descending in grass-covered, terraced rings, the rings of rings vary in size with the largest ending in a depth of 30 meters (98 feet) deep and 220 meters (722 feet) wide. Studies have shown that many of the terraces contain soil that must have been imported from other parts of the region. The temperature at the top of the pits varies from that at the bottom of the ringed pits by as much as 15 degrees Celsius , creating a series of micro-climates that not coincidentally match many of the varied climate conditions among the Incan empire. It is now believed that the rings were used as a test bed to see what crops could grow where. This proto-America’s-Test-Kitchen is yet another example of the Incan ingenuity that makes them one of the most remarkable of declined societies in the planet’s history.

Keep exploring at Atlas Obscura

Jul 25 2014

atlasobscura:

GRANDE BALLROOM -DETROIT, MICHIGAN

The Grande Ballroom was designed in 1928 by Charles N. Agree in the Art Deco style with Moorish influences. The jazz venue featured a floor on springs in its ballroom, giving people the illusion of floating while they danced.

In 1966 it reopened as a rock venue, transformed by Russ Gibb, a middle school social studies teacher and radio DJ, into a home for the psychedelic and garage rock scene. Soon the Detroit counterculture crowd was pulsing in the glare of one of the largest strobe lights ever constructed to music by emerging local acts like MC5 and the Stooges, as well already legendary bands like the Velvet Underground, the Who, and Pink Floyd.

In 1972, the Grande Ballroom closed. Fixtures were stolen, windows shattered, and plaster fell from the ceiling. Like the blight overtaking the neighborhood surrounding it, neglect has left it in a dire state of disrepair.

Jul 17 2014

(Source: scificity, via 90s90s90s)

Jul 16 2014
80s-90s-stuff:

90s G.I. Joe comic cover #104 feat. Snake Eyes (1990)

80s-90s-stuff:

90s G.I. Joe comic cover #104 feat. Snake Eyes (1990)

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