RoguePanda

Jul 29 2014
Jul 28 2014

peashooter85:

Marathon runners eat your hearts out —- The Tendai Monks of Mt. Hiei.

The Tendai Monks of Mt. Hiei in Japan are an ancient Buddhist order that trace their origins as far back 806 AD.  Masters of mental and physical discipline, among their regular meditation and religious worship, the Tendai Monks practice an ancient endurance challenge that ranks as one of the most grueling endurance challenges of all human history.

The Tendai Monks like to prove their mental discipline through acts of physical endurance.  These devoted Buddhists take the saying, “where the mind goes, the body will follow” to the highest extreme.  Called the “Kaihogyo” (circling the mountain), the Tendai Monks walk a series of roads and trails which circle Mt. Hiei.  The full Kaihogyo takes seven years to complete altogether, with the first year being a trial period, and the remaining six being the ultimate challenge.

Most monks typically only do the first year of the Kaihogyo, which is a challenge in itself.  In that year the monks walk 30 kilometers (18.6 miles) a day for 100 consecutive days.  During the walk, the monks only take breaks to pray or meditate at the various shrines that circle Mt. Hiei.  When walking the monks wear their traditional monastic garb, as well as hand woven straw sandals for footwear.   

If a monk completes the first year of the Kaihogyo, he may petition the remaining monks to complete the remaining six years of the challenge.  Originally in ancient and medieval Japan, there was no turning back after being accepted to complete the Kaihogyo.  Those who failed to complete the challenge committed ritual suicide.  Today in modern Japan, the suicide clause of the Kaihogyo has been removed from the challenge.

The remaining of the Kaihogyo follows as thus, on years 2 and 3 the monk must walk 30 km a day for 100 consecutive days.  On years 4 and 5 the monk must walk 30 km a day for 200 consecutive days.  On year 6 the monk must walk 60 km (37.3 miles) a day for 100 consecutive days.  Finally on year 7 the monk must walk a whopping 84 km a day (52.2 miles) for a consecutive 100 days, followed by a “cooling off” period of 30 km a day for 100 consecutive days.  During “rest periods” of the year, the monk is expected to complete all his monastic duties, such as administering to the public, meditating, worshiping, conducting scholarly studies, and completing chores around the monastery.

Those who complete Kaihogyo will have certainly achieved an amazing feet, walking 38,500 kilometers (23,860.7 miles).  That’s only about 1,500 km short of walking the circumference of the Earth.  Few have ever completed the challenge.  In fact since 1885 only 46 monks have successfully completed the full 1,000 days.  One of the oldest was a monk named Yusai Sakai, who completed the Kaihogyo at the age of 60 in 1987.  

(Source: barefoot-running.us)

Jul 27 2014
Jul 26 2014

atlasobscura:

Moray -Peru

Unlike a number of the elaborate metropolis’ and statuary left behind by the Incan people the rings at Moray are relatively simple but may have actually been an ingenious series of test beds. Descending in grass-covered, terraced rings, the rings of rings vary in size with the largest ending in a depth of 30 meters (98 feet) deep and 220 meters (722 feet) wide. Studies have shown that many of the terraces contain soil that must have been imported from other parts of the region. The temperature at the top of the pits varies from that at the bottom of the ringed pits by as much as 15 degrees Celsius , creating a series of micro-climates that not coincidentally match many of the varied climate conditions among the Incan empire. It is now believed that the rings were used as a test bed to see what crops could grow where. This proto-America’s-Test-Kitchen is yet another example of the Incan ingenuity that makes them one of the most remarkable of declined societies in the planet’s history.

Keep exploring at Atlas Obscura

Jul 25 2014

atlasobscura:

GRANDE BALLROOM -DETROIT, MICHIGAN

The Grande Ballroom was designed in 1928 by Charles N. Agree in the Art Deco style with Moorish influences. The jazz venue featured a floor on springs in its ballroom, giving people the illusion of floating while they danced.

In 1966 it reopened as a rock venue, transformed by Russ Gibb, a middle school social studies teacher and radio DJ, into a home for the psychedelic and garage rock scene. Soon the Detroit counterculture crowd was pulsing in the glare of one of the largest strobe lights ever constructed to music by emerging local acts like MC5 and the Stooges, as well already legendary bands like the Velvet Underground, the Who, and Pink Floyd.

In 1972, the Grande Ballroom closed. Fixtures were stolen, windows shattered, and plaster fell from the ceiling. Like the blight overtaking the neighborhood surrounding it, neglect has left it in a dire state of disrepair.

Jul 17 2014

(Source: scificity, via 90s90s90s)

Jul 16 2014
80s-90s-stuff:

90s G.I. Joe comic cover #104 feat. Snake Eyes (1990)

80s-90s-stuff:

90s G.I. Joe comic cover #104 feat. Snake Eyes (1990)

Jul 15 2014
Jul 14 2014
Jul 12 2014

darksilenceinsuburbia:

The Kitten Covers by Alfra Martini

1. The Furry Underground

2. London Meowing

3. Katti Smith

4. Kitty Pop

5. David Meowie

6. The RaMEOWnes

7. Mew Reed

8. Meowvin Gaye

9. Squees (with John Tabbyolta and Olivia Meowton John)

Tumblr

Jul 07 2014
Jun 30 2014
vicemag:

Can Science Find a Safe Replacement for Alcohol?
There is a knot of pain just behind my right eye that throbs in time with my pulse. My eyes feel raw. My mouth is dry. Last night’s booze-induced heroics are a distant memory. In the harsh light of day, I feel simply terrible, and yet, next weekend, I’m liable to do it all over again.
When it comes to legal intoxicants, alcohol is essentially the only choice available. It is the world’s most widely used drug, and can be safely deemed toxic, addictive, and linked to violent behavior. As the failed American experiment with alcohol prohibition in the 1920s and 30s demonstrated, the desire for easy intoxication will seemingly always be a part of our society. But with a massive pharmacopeia and scientific infrastructure at our disposal, why do we still rely on such an imperfect means to accomplish that goal?
That imperfection was on display in a study released last week by the Center for Disease Control (CDIC). Their researchers have determined excessive drinking to be responsible for the deaths of 1 in 10 working-age adults in the US. In total, 88,000 Americans die every year from alcohol.
Continue

vicemag:

Can Science Find a Safe Replacement for Alcohol?

There is a knot of pain just behind my right eye that throbs in time with my pulse. My eyes feel raw. My mouth is dry. Last night’s booze-induced heroics are a distant memory. In the harsh light of day, I feel simply terrible, and yet, next weekend, I’m liable to do it all over again.

When it comes to legal intoxicants, alcohol is essentially the only choice available. It is the world’s most widely used drug, and can be safely deemed toxic, addictive, and linked to violent behavior. As the failed American experiment with alcohol prohibition in the 1920s and 30s demonstrated, the desire for easy intoxication will seemingly always be a part of our society. But with a massive pharmacopeia and scientific infrastructure at our disposal, why do we still rely on such an imperfect means to accomplish that goal?

That imperfection was on display in a study released last week by the Center for Disease Control (CDIC). Their researchers have determined excessive drinking to be responsible for the deaths of 1 in 10 working-age adults in the US. In total, 88,000 Americans die every year from alcohol.

Continue

Jun 29 2014

mensrightsactivism:

A Voice for Men, a men’s rights site that is most notable for being featured as a hate site by the Southern Poverty Law Center, is currently hosting a conference on men’s issues in Detroit.

The images above are direct quotes of what some of the speakers at this men’s rights conference have said.

Sit back and marvel at the newest human rights movement.

Thanks to both David Futrelle at We Hunted The Mammoth for the excellent article that inspired this post and whey_ over at the againstmensrights subreddit for making the above images.

Please share this post far and wide so everyone knows exactly what men’s rights activists believe!

(via elcorazoninsuficiente)

Jun 27 2014

yvynyl:

Chancha Via Circuto - Coplita (feat Miriam García)

This is the kind of PR that gets me to click the play button: “In their music is a reformulation of the Latin music world; the starting point was digital cumbia, but today, Chancha is forging unprecedented mergers between Brazilian rhythms, Paraguayan harp, Andean mysticism, the solitude of Argentine folklore from the Pampas, and spatial projection, all of which have been processed through a futuristic strain of post-dubstep electronic music.”

Art, animation by Paula Duró and FX and edition by Mariela Bond. Look for his upcoming album Amansara LP being released by Wonderwheel Recordings (USA, Oceania), Crammed Disc (Europe, Asia) and Charco (South America) in late September 2014.

Jun 26 2014
semensperms:

Danger: Diabolik

semensperms:

Danger: Diabolik

(via sinyasiki)

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